New Editor-in-Chief Appointed for Nurse Educator

marilyn oMarilyn Oermann, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF has been appointed as the Editor-in-Chief of Nurse Educator. This message from the publisher, Beth Guthy, was posted on the journal’s website:

Dear Nursing Educators and Researchers,

Please join me in welcoming  Marilyn H. Oermann, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN to the role of Editor-in-Chief of Nurse Educator.  As Director of Evaluation and Educational Research at Duke University School of Nursing, Dr. Oermann will bring her rich experience and voice to Nurse Educator.   A prolific author, speaker and mentor, you may also recognize Dr. Oermann as the Editor of the Journal of Nursing Care Quality.  We are delighted to welcome her to Nurse Educator and look forward to the leadership and expertise that she brings to the Journal and to the nursing education community.

At this time we would also like to offer our sincere thanks to Karen S. Hill, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, FACHE, FAAN and Editor-in-Chief of JONA for her enormous efforts as Interim Editor of Nurse Educator over the last few months, and for the seamless transition to Dr. Oermann this February.  Thank you, too,  to the many board members, column editors, reviewers and authors who stepped in to offer strong support and ensure the ongoing success of Nurse Educator after the unexpected loss of our Editor, mentor and friend Suzanne P. Smith, RN, EdD, FAAN last Fall.

Please continue to share your ideas, contents and expertise with Nurse Educator.  We are looking forward to an exciting 2014 as Dr. Oermann takes the helm and works with the editorial board  to grow Nurse Educator, maintain relevance through outstanding evidence-based content and increase our reach in the education segment.

Beth L. Guthy
Publisher, Nurse Educator

Congratulations to Marilyn! Please leave best wishes or other words of encouragement for her in the comments.

Editor Search: Journal of Clinical Nursing

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Applications are invited for the position of
Editor
Journal of Clinical Nursing

We are currently seeking applications for the position of Editor on the Journal of Clinical Nursing, to complete a team of an Editor-in-Chief and three Editors working on this leading international nursing journal.

The Journal of Clinical Nursing (JCN) is an international, peer reviewed, scientific journal that seeks to promote the development and exchange of knowledge that is directly relevant to all spheres of nursing and midwifery practice. The primary aim is to promote a high standard of clinically related scholarship which supports the practice and discipline of nursing and midwifery. Detailed information about the journal can be found at www.wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/jocn.

The successful candidate for the position of Editor will: be recognized internationally for the quality of her or his academic and research achievements; have worked at a strategic level within academia or healthcare; and have an impressive track record of publications and presentations at conferences. The ideal candidate will possess the following skills and knowledge:

  • Sound scientific judgment
  • Broad knowledge of nursing and midwifery on an international level
  • Awareness of trends and standards within knowledge dissemination
  • Excellent written and verbal communication
  • Ability to work to tight deadlines
  • Ability to work effectively as a team member as well as individually
  • Demonstrated track record in peer review activities for scholarly journals
  • Previous experience in Editor-type role

The main functions within this role are: manuscript handling and quality control, preparation of issues, strategic development, and journal promotion. The position involves working closely with other members of the Editorial Team which includes the Publisher, the other two Editors, and the Editor-in-Chief.

Applicants should note that this position requires a weekly commitment of time, with additional days required for meetings. The Editor can be based in any international location.

Applications should include a curriculum vitae, a short assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of JCN, detail of peer-review and previous editorial experience, and an accompanying letter outlining the skills you would bring to this position.

A description of the role and an information pack about the journal are available on request. Please send your application, in confidence, to:

Rosie Hutchinson, Journal Publishing Manager, Wiley-Blackwell, 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford OX4 2DQ, UK. Email to rosie.hutchinson@wiley.com

Applications to arrive no later than 31st March 2014

ICN welcomes New Associate Editors of International Nursing Review

ICN Welcomes New Associate Editors of International Nursing Review

Geneva, Switzerland, 3 February 2014 – The International Council of Nurses is pleased to announce that Dr Pamela Mitchell and Dr Valerie Ehlers have been named as Associate Editors of the International Nursing Review, the official journal of the International Council of Nurses.

Dr. Pamela Mitchell

Dr. Pamela Mitchell

“I am delighted to welcome Pamela and Valerie to the staff of the INR,” said Dr Sue Turale, Editor of the INR. “Coming from different backgrounds and experiences, they will bring fresh new ideas and perspective to the journal. They have significant scholarly and practice qualities, and are passionate about helping nurses and midwives to publish and share knowledge. They are a great addition to the team.”

“I am pleased and honored to be joining the editorial group for the International Nursing Review,” said Dr Mitchell. “It is a wonderful opportunity to be part of the growing global influence of nursing.”

“It is a true honour to be part of the INR staff,” added Dr Ehlers.  “And I look forward to continuing the growth and success of this well-respected journal.”

Pamela Mitchell is Professor of Bio-behavioral Nursing and Health Systems, Adjunct Professor, Department of Health Services and founding Director of the Center for Health Sciences Interprofessional Education and Research at the University of Washington. She received a BSN from the University of Washington, an MS with a focus on medical-surgical clinical specialisation from the University of California, San Francisco, and a Ph.D. in Health Care Systems Ecology from the University of Washington. Her research and teaching focus on hospital care delivery systems, effective management of clinical care systems, biobehavioral interventions for patients with acute and chronic cardio-cerebrovascular disease, and outcomes of interprofessional education. She was recently elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences, and is very well published.

Dr. Valerie Ehlers

Dr. Valerie Ehlers

Valerie Ehlers, a nurse educator and academic until her retirement from the University of South Africa in December 2013, holds the following degrees: B Soc Sc (Nursing), Honours B Soc Sc (Psychology), BA Cur, Honours BA Cur, MA Cur and D Litt et Phil. She is registered with the South African Nursing Council as a general nurse, midwife, psychiatric nurse, community health nurse. She has worked in the fields of community health, midwifery, orthopaedics and medical-surgical nursing and has presented many conference papers/posters and has been published in many national and international journals and other publications. Dr Ehlers served on the editorial boards of two national and two international journals and reviewed articles for various journals. From 2009 till 2013 she was the executive editor of the Africa Journal of Nursing & Midwifery (AJNM).  A highlight was the AJNM’s accreditation as an academic journal by South Africa’s Department of Higher Education and Training in 2008, based on documents compiled by her. She has received the 2012 Women’s Research Leadership Award from the University of South Africa, and the Hall of Fame for Research Excellence in Nursing from the Forum of University Nursing Deans in South Africa in 2011.  She is married and the proud mother of two daughters.

In Memory of Carol “Pat” Patsdaughter, PhD, RN, ACRN

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Carol A. “Pat” Patsdaugter

It is with great sadness that we share the news that INANE member Carol “Pat” Patsdaughter, PhD, RN, ACRN, passed away on January 26, 2014.  Pat was a cherished colleague, committed nursing leader, and INANE champion.

Pat’s work as the Associate Editor for the Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC) demonstrated a commitment not only to JANAC, but also to nursing and nursing publication.  She was a respected Professor of Nursing at the Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences at Florida International University, where she was known for her ability to mentor students.  Pat was an INANE member for more than a decade, and she was always a presence at INANE Conferences, which she thoroughly enjoyed and where she always made friends. Pat will be remembered fondly and missed deeply.

If you would like to honor Pat’s memory, consider a donation to the Suzanne Smith Development Fund in her honor. This fund was established to support the Mentoring Editors Awards, of which the inaugural four will be awarded next month. These awards provide support for four nurses with an emerging interest in the editorial role–as well as those new to an editorial role–to attend INANE with registration deferred. While the awards and the fund are named after our colleague Suzanne Smith who died in 2013, serving as an editor and mentoring others were also core values and a true part of Pat’s spirit. Honor her work with a donation to the development fund and help her memory and legacy live on through INANE.

A memorial is planned in Fort Lauderdale, FL for Saturday, February 1, 2014.

A Nurse Gains Fame in the Days of Polio

(If you have an extra gift card from Christmas, you might want to spend it on this book. LHN)

from the New York Times.
DECEMBER 26, 2013, 12:01 AM

A Nurse Gains Fame in the Days of Polio

By BARRON H. LERNER, M.D.

17well_petrowbook-articleInlineIn the years after World War II, Eleanor Roosevelt routinely won polls as America’s most admired woman. But in a 1952 Gallup poll, she was beaten by an Australian nurse, Elizabeth Kenny, popularly known as Sister Kenny.

Today, Elizabeth Kenny is largely forgotten. But thanks to a new biography by the Yale University historian of medicine Naomi Rogers, “Polio Wars: Sister Kenny and the Golden Age of American Medicine,” readers can learn why she gained such fame. And while Ms. Kenny’s work was mostly in polio, which has now nearly been eradicated, her emphasis on the care of individual patients and close bedside observation could not be more relevant in an era dominated by randomized controlled trials.

Ms. Kenny was an unlikely celebrity. Born in Australia in 1880, she became a “bush nurse,” serving a largely rural population. It was World War I that opened up her vistas; she worked as a British army nurse on troop ships and earned the honorific title “Sister,” the equivalent of a lieutenant, for her service. Contrary to popular belief, Ms. Kenny was not a nun.

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Nobel Winner Declares Boycott of Top Science Journals

Randy Schekman says his lab will no longer send papers to Nature, Cell and Science as they distort scientific process

, science correspondent, The Guardian, Monday 9 December 2013 14.42 EST

Leading academic journals are distorting the scientific process and represent a “tyranny” that must be broken, according to a Nobel prize winner who has declared a boycott on the publications.

Randy Schekman, centre, at a Nobel prize ceremony in Stockholm. Photograph: Rob Schoenbaum/Zuma Press/Corbis

Randy Schekman, centre, at a Nobel prize ceremony in Stockholm. Photograph: Rob Schoenbaum/Zuma Press/Corbis

Randy Schekman, a US biologist who won the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine this year and receives his prize in Stockholm on Tuesday, said his lab would no longer send research papers to the top-tier journals, Nature, Cell and Science.

Schekman said pressure to publish in “luxury” journals encouraged researchers to cut corners and pursue trendy fields of science instead of doing more important work. The problem was exacerbated, he said, by editors who were not active scientists but professionals who favoured studies that were likely to make a splash.

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First Non-North American President for Sigma Theta Tau

INDIANAPOLIS, Nov. 26, 2013 /PRNewswire/ – Hester Klopper, PhD, MBA, RN, RM, FANSA, of Potchefstroom, South Africa was installed last week as the first non-North American president of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) at the society’s 42nd Biennial Convention in Indianapolis, Ind.

HONOR SOCIETY OF NURSING HESTER KLOPPER

Dr. Hester Klopper

STTI boasts a robust global network with 492 chapters throughout 90 countries; now, international leadership will provide a new perspective for the 90-year-old organization.

“Dr. Hester Klopper’s installation as president of the honor society marks an important step as we become more intentionally global,” said STTI Chief Executive Officer Patricia E. Thompson, EdD, RN, FAAN. “She will be an inspirational leader whose global vision will prove valuable now and in the future.”

The role of nurses in influencing government policy and enhancing health systems worldwide are focal points for Klopper. At her direction, STTI has taken the lead in creating the Global Advisory Panel on the Future of Nursing, which will meet for the first time in Switzerland in March 2014.

Also central to Klopper’s work is the leadership and capacity development of young scientists. In South Africa, Klopper coordinates the PLUME program, funded by the National Research Foundation (NRF), to support the development of post-doctoral candidates’ research.

In her presidential call to action, Klopper detailed the four themes of her biennium of service: servant leadership, connectedness, transformation, and gratitude.

“By their very nature, nurses epitomize servant leadership,” Klopper said. “I am thrilled to see the transformational impact STTI members continue to make on a global scale. I am deeply honored to be entrusted with the leadership of this global organization.”

Klopper has extensive networks in global health, public health, policy development, nursing, and health care. She is the chief executive officer of the Forum for University Nursing Deans in South Africa (FUNDISA) and a research scholar with more than 60 peer-reviewed publications.

Learn about Klopper here.

NLN Foundation Announces Spring 2014 Writing Retreats

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The NLN Foundation Announces Writing Retreats for Spring 2014!

Scholarly Writing Retreats Spring 2014
March 21-23, 2014
The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education
Chapel Hill, NC
Leader: Marilyn H. Oermann, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN

April 25-27, 2014
Embassy Suites Phoenix North
Phoenix, AZ
Leader: Leslie H. Nicoll, PhD, MBA, RN, BC

Registration Fee: $825 (Registration includes tuition, meals, and two nights’ accommodation at the host site.)

Program Description


Thanks to a generous five-year grant from Pocket Nurse Enterprises, Inc., the National League for Nursing and the NLN Foundation for Nursing Education are pleased to continue the expansion of the NLN Scholarly Writing Retreat, now in its sixth year.

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Seen in the New York Times…

GIRLS-02-popupA new campaign has been launched in New York City called the New York City Girls Project. It is designed to tell girls they are beautiful the way they are. An article in the New York Times on Monday, September 30 profiled the project which was noted to be the first campaign aimed at female body image to be carried out by a major city.

Margaret Comerford Freda, editor of MCN: The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing brought the article to my attention because of this paragraph:

City officials cited evidence in The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing and elsewhere that more than 80 percent of 10-year-old girls are afraid of being fat, that girls’ self-esteem drops at age 12 and does not improve until 20, and that that is tied to negative body image.

Margaret told me that the research they were referring to was done by Dr. Linda Andrist and published in MCN. Her study on Media Images, Body Dissatisfaction, and Disordered Eating in Adolescent Women found that more than 80% of girls over 10 were afraid of becoming fat, and that self esteem dropped at age 12.

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