Creating New Solutions from Caring Ideas

Sanofi announces nursing recognition program to help turn caring ideas into new solutions

Nurses worldwide are encouraged to enter an exciting recognition program showcasing nursing innovations and care solutions

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO March 31, 2012

Paris, France, 9 November, 2011…  Sanofi and its partnering organizations, the International Council of Nurses (ICN); the Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation (NPHF); le Secrétariat International Des Infirmières et Infirmiers de l’Espace Francophone (SIDIIEF); and l’Association Française pour le Développement de l’Education Thérapeutique (AFDET) are delighted to announce the CARE CHALLENGE  recognition programme (www.care-challenge.com), inviting nurses to submit their innovative patient care ideas and projects. Nurses from anywhere around the world can share, exchange, and nominate projects and ideas for the CARE CHALLENGE initiative and be eligible to receive an award. To accommodate the international scope of this programme, the deadline for submissions online at www.care-challenge.com has been extended to March 31, 2012.

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From Today’s New York Times: Calling the Nurse ‘Doctor’

Calling the Nurse ‘Doctor,’ a Title Physicians Oppose

By 

NASHVILLE — With pain in her right ear, Sue Cassidy went to a clinic. The doctor, wearing a white lab coat with a stethoscope in one pocket, introduced herself.

“Hi. I’m Dr. Patti McCarver, and I’m your nurse,” she said. And with that, Dr. McCarver stuck a scope in Ms. Cassidy’s ear, noticed a buildup of fluid and prescribed an allergy medicine.

It was something that will become increasingly routine for patients: a someone who is not a physician using the title of doctor.

Dr. McCarver calls herself a doctor because she returned to school to earn a doctorate last year, one of thousands of nurses doing the same recently. Doctorates are popping up all over the health professions, and the result is a quiet battle over not only the title “doctor,” but also the money, power and prestige that often comes with it.

As more nurses, pharmacists and physical therapists claim this honorific, physicians are fighting back. For nurses, getting doctorates can help them land a top administrative job at a hospital, improve their standing at a university and win them more respect from colleagues and patients. But so far, the new degrees have not brought higher fees from insurers for seeing patients or greater authority from states to prescribe medicines.

Nursing leaders say that their push to have more nurses earn doctorates has nothing to do with their fight of several decades in state legislatures to give nurses more autonomy, money and prescriptive power.

But many physicians are suspicious and say that once tens of thousands of nurses have doctorates, they will invariably seek more prescribing authority and more money. Otherwise, they ask, what is the point?

To read the entire article, click here.

RWJF Announces 12 Faculty Scholars

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Announces
12 New ‘Nurse Faculty Scholars’

Prestigious Program Advances Careers, Health Research of Promising Junior Nurse Faculty

PRINCETON, N.J., Sept. 1, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) today announced the names of the 12 outstanding nursing faculty from across the country who were selected to participate in its prestigious Nurse Faculty Scholars program this year.  The RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars program is strengthening the academic productivity and overall excellence of nursing schools by developing the next generation of leaders in academic nursing. It is providing $28 million over five years to outstanding junior nursing faculty to promote their academic careers, support their research and reduce the nation’s severe nurse faculty shortage. This is the fourth cohort of RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars.

Each Nurse Faculty Scholar receives a three-year $350,000 grant to pursue research, as well as mentoring from senior faculty at his or her institution. The award is given to junior faculty who show outstanding promise as future leaders in academic nursing.  The Scholars chosen this year are conducting a range of health studies, from using story-telling to encourage Native American women to get mammograms, to using simulation to help reduce medical errors in hospitals caused by interruptions, to examining the impact of family strength and parenting on reducing risky behavior among teens, to investigating whether home improvements can realize health benefits for disabled, low-income seniors.

“Several Scholars in earlier cohorts have published their research and are already helping to improve health care and advance nursing and nursing education,” said Jacquelyn Campbell, Ph.D., R.N, F.A.A.N., national program director for the RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars Program.  Campbell is Anna D. Wolf Chair and professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, which provides technical direction to the program. “It’s exciting to begin the work with this newest group of Scholars and I look forward to seeing where their work, their enthusiasm and their skills take them.”

This year’s selection comes as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is embarking on a collaborative campaign to transform the nursing profession to improve health and health care.  Based on the recommendations from a groundbreaking Institute of Medicine nursing report released last year—The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, RWJF is spearheading the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action to engage nurses and non-nurses in a nationwide effort to overhaul the nursing profession. The campaign is working to implement solutions to the challenges facing the nursing profession and to build upon nurse-based approaches to improving quality and transforming the way Americans receive health care.

Supporting junior nurse faculty will help curb a shortage of nurse educators that could undermine the health and health care of all Americans. The Affordable Care Act will vastly increase the number of people who can access health care in the United States. As the number of patients increases, there will be greater demand for skilled nurses and faculty to educate them.  Right now, many schools of nursing are turning away qualified applicants because they lack the faculty to teach them.

The RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars program is helping to curb the shortage by helping more junior faculty succeed in, and commit to, academic careers. The program provides talented junior faculty with salary and research support as well as the chance to participate in institutional and national mentoring activities, leadership training, and networking events with colleagues in nursing and other fields, while continuing to teach and provide institutional, professional and community service at their universities.

“We are particularly pleased that several of our scholars are reaching a level of achievement recognized by the American Academy of Nursing,” said Campbell. “Three scholars were inducted as fellows of the American Academy of Nursing last year, and this year six more will receive that honor.”

The RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars Program strives to increase the racial, ethnic, and gender diversity of nursing by fostering leadership skills among scholars to recruit and retain diverse faculties and student bodies at their schools of nursing.  To that end, the program encourages applicants with diverse backgrounds.

The program will also enhance the stature of the scholars’ academic institutions, which will benefit fellow nurse educators seeking professional development opportunities.

To receive the award, scholars must be registered nurses who have completed a research doctorate in nursing or a related discipline and who have held a tenure-eligible faculty position at an accredited nursing school for at least two and no more than five years.

This year’s Nurse Faculty Scholar award recipients and their research projects are:

  • Anna Beeber, Ph.D., R.N., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Developing Best Nursing Practices in Assisted Living;
  • Jennifer Bellot, Ph.D., R.N., M.H.S.A., Thomas Jefferson University, Painting a Portrait of Utilization and Integration: Medicare and Nurse Managed Centers;  
  • Tina Bloom, Ph.D., R.N., The Curators of University of Missouri, Internet-based Safety Planning with Abused Pregnant Rural Women;
  • Alexa Doig, Ph.D., R.N., University of Utah, Simulation Training to Reduce Medication Errors Caused by Interruptions;
  • Jill Esquivel, Ph.D., R.N., N.P.,  University of California, San Francisco, A Self Care Intervention for Hispanic Patients with Heart Failure;  
  • Rosa Gonzalez-Guarda, Ph.D., R.N., University of Miami, Joven (Youth): Juntos Opuestos a la Violencia Entre Novios/Together Against Teen Dating Violence;
  • Nalo Hamilton, Ph.D., R.N., University of California, Los Angeles, Insulin-Like Growth Factor-2, Estrogen Receptors and Racial Disparities;  
  • Emily Haozous, Ph.D., R.N., University of New Mexico, Digital Storytelling and Medical Mistrust in American Indian Women;
  • Tsui-Sui Annie Kao, Ph.D., R.N., University of Michigan, Family Collective Efficacy: An Underdeveloped Mechanism to Minimize Adolescent Risk Behaviors;
  • Matthew McHugh, Ph.D., J.D., M.P.H., R.N., C.R.N.P., University of Pennsylvania, Nursing Care Environment, Neighborhood, and Racial and Ethnic Disparities;
  • Elena Siegel, Ph.D., R.N., University of California, Davis, Leadership Support for Quality Improvement in Nursing Homes; and  
  • Sarah Szanton, Ph.D., C.R.N.P., Johns Hopkins University, Bio-Behavioral Mediators of Enhanced Daily Function in Disabled Low –Income Older Adults.

To learn more about the program, visit www.nursefacultyscholars.org.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation focuses on the pressing health and health care issues facing our country. As the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and health care, the Foundation works with a diverse group of organizations and individuals to identify solutions and achieve comprehensive, measurable and timely change. For nearly 40 years the Foundation has brought experience, commitment, and a rigorous, balanced approach to the problems that affect the health and health care of those it serves. When it comes to helping Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need, the Foundation expects to make a difference in your lifetime. For more information, visit www.rwjf.org.

 

 

 

Apropos of the social media discussion at the conference last week…

I thought this article might be of interest. From the Washington Post

Drug companies lose protections on Facebook, some decide to close pages

By Christian Torres, Published: August 12

Relationship status: “It’s Complicated.”

Facebook and the pharmaceutical industry have had an uneasy partnership in recent years. Many drug companies didn’t even join the site until Facebook gave them a privilege that others do not have — blocking the public’s ability to openly comment on a page Wall.

But that’s about to change.

In a reversal by Facebook, most drug company pages will have to have open Walls starting Monday.

Companies are worried that open Walls mean open risks, and many are reconsidering their engagement on Facebook. AstraZeneca shut down on Friday a page devoted to depression — the company sells the antidepressant Seroquel. Johnson & Johnson said it will close four of its pages on Monday. Other companies said they will monitor their pages more closely once the changes take effect.

The industry is concerned that users might write about bad side effects, promote off-label use or make inappropriate statements about a product. Aside from poor word of mouth, the comments could raise concerns from government regulators.

Facebook will not say what specifically prompted its change of heart. Andrew Noyes, manager of public policy communications for Facebook, said in an e-mail, “We think these changes will help encourage an authentic dialogue on pages.”

Facebook will allow companies to continue to block Wall comments on specific prescription product pages, but those are a minority of pharmaceutical company pages. Most pages — soon to be open — are focused on companies themselves or on disease or patient-specific communities, which then have ties to the companies’ prescription products.

To read the entire article, click here.

* * * * *

In nursing news, today is the 101st anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s death. She died in London in 1910 at the age of 90. This stained glass window was restored and rededicated to her memory in October 2010. It is in St. Peter’s Church, Derby. According to Wikipedia:

A remarkable stained glass window was commissioned for inclusion in the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary chapel in the late 1950s. When the chapel was later demolished the window was removed, stored and replaced in the new replacement chapel. At the closure of the DRI the window was again removed and stored. In October 2010, £6,000 was raised by friends of the window and St Peters Church to reposition the window in St Peters Church, Derby. The remarkable work features nine panels, of the original ten, depicting scenes of hospital life, Derby townscapes and Florence Nightingale herself. Some of the work was damaged and the tenth panel was dismantled for the glass to be used in repair of the remaining panels. All the figures, who are said to be modelled on prominent Derby town figures of the early sixties, surround and praise a central pane of the triumphant Christ. A nurse who posed for the top right panel in 1959 attended the rededication service in October 2010.

In Memory: Dr. Luther Christman

Dr. Luther Christman in 1980.

I just learned that Dr. Luther Christman died on June 7, 2011 in Nashville, Tennessee. He was 96.

I first met Dr. Christman when I was in graduate school at the University of Illinois at the Medical Center (now UIC) and he was the Dean at “the college across the street” (Rush University). Years later, I had the honor to introduce him for a presentation at the Biennial Conference for Sigma Theta Tau. My memory is that he was a gracious, warm, and truly genuine man.

His contributions to the profession of nursing are numerous and legendary. Over the past few days, I’ve enjoyed reading various remembrances of his life. I’ll share a few links for all of you:

Obituary from the Chicago Sun-Times
From RushIn Person, a nice tribute from the Rush Archives
From the University of Michigan School of Nursing
Article at Nurse.com

Elizabeth Pittman has written a biography of Dr. Christman; a preview can be viewed here. It can be purchased at the site or as a Kindle book from Amazon.

It seems as if the one thing he didn’t do was serve as an Editor of a journal! Can someone correct me if I’m wrong about that? Thanks!

Centers of Excellence in Nursing Education

National League for Nursing Announces New Centers of Excellence™

Selected Schools to Be Recognized During 2011 NLN Education Summit

New York, NY — July 27, 2011 — Eight schools of nursing, representing programs across the academic spectrum, have been chosen NLN Centers of Excellence, the League has announced. These schools will be formally recognized at a special presentation on Friday, September 23 at 9:00 am at the NLN’s annual Education Summit in Orlando, FL. The four-day gathering every year draws a capacity crowd of nurse faculty, deans, administrators, and professionals from allied health organizations. The COE presentation will directly follow the NLN CEO Summit Address at 8:30 am.”Schools work hard to earn the coveted COE designation,” said NLN CEO Beverly Malone, PhD, RN, FAAN. “What we seek are measurable results and best practices, and the NLN is pleased to publicly name those schools that have demonstrated their understanding of excellence in the concrete terms that the COE application demands.” Schools may earn COE status in one of three categories: Enhancing Student Learning and Professional Development; Promoting the Pedagogical Expertise of Faculty; or Enhancing the Science of Nursing Education.

Six of this year’s eight schools are repeat COE designees, with two—Excelsior College in Albany, NY and University of North Carolina at Greensboro—earning their third consecutive COE designation. This has entitled them to now carry the COE designation for an additional year, from 2011 to 2016. (COE schools are now designated for a four-year period; until 2011, the initial designation was for three years.) Excelsior has been chosen in the category of Enhancing Student Learning and Professional Development, UNC-Greensboro in Promoting the Pedagogical Expertise of Faculty.

The other four repeat Centers of Excellence are currently completing their initial term, all for Enhancing Student Learning and Professional Development. Duquesne University (Pittsburgh, PA); East Carolina University (Greenville, NC); Regis College (Weston, MA); and Trinitas School of Nursing (Elizabeth, NJ) will carry the designation from 2011-2015.

First-time designees Collin College (McKinney, TX), for Enhancing Student Learning and Professional Development, and University of Connecticut (Storrs, CT), for Promoting the Pedagogical Expertise of Faculty, have been named Centers of Excellence for the 2011-2015 term.

Each year since 2004, the NLN has invited nursing schools to apply for COE status, based on their ability to demonstrate sustained excellence in faculty development, nursing education research, or student learning and professional development. Schools must also have a proven commitment to continuous quality improvement.

Throughout the four or more years that schools carry the COE designation, they are expected to serve as advisers and sounding boards to other nursing programs that seek to gain COE distinction. “The COE banner carries with it a responsibility to the entire academic community,” noted Cathleen Shultz, PhD, RN, CNE, FAAN, president of the NLN. “We expect that COE schools will help educate and inspire others, thus elevating the standards of excellence throughout all levels of higher education in nursing.”

Also, each year, students enrolled in COE schools have an opportunity to share their thoughts on the meaning of excellence in nursing education, what fosters excellence, and what it means to them to be part of a COE-designated nursing program. As in years past, the winner of the Student Excellence Paper Competition will be announced at the COE presentation. She is Tuesday Majors from Indiana University School of Nursing. Her winning submission is entitled “Excellence in Nursing Education.”

Free Titles from the National Academies Press

MORE THAN 4,000 NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS PDFs

NOW AVAILABLE TO DOWNLOAD FOR FREE

The National Academies—National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council—are committed to distributing their reports to as wide an audience as possible. Since 1994 we have offered “Read for Free” options for almost all our titles. In addition, we have been offering free downloads of most of our titles to everyone and of all titles to readers in the developing world. We are now going one step further. Effective June 2nd, PDFs of reports that are currently for sale on the National Academies Press (NAP) Website and PDFs associated with future reports* will be offered free of charge to all Web visitors.

For more than 140 years, the NAS, NAE, IOM, and NRC have been advising the nation on issues of science, technology, and medicine. Like no other collection of organizations, the Academies enlist the nation’s foremost scientists, engineers, health professionals, and other experts to address the scientific and technical aspects of society’s most pressing problems. The results of their work are authoritative and independent studies published by the National Academies Press.

NAP produces more than 200 books a year on a wide range of topics in science, engineering, and health, capturing the best-informed views on important issues. Of particular interest to readers of this blog is The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health which was released earlier this year.

We invite you to visit the NAP homepage and experience the new opportunities available to access our publications. There you can sign up for MyNAP, a new way for us to deliver all of our content for free to loyal subscribers like you and to reward you with exclusive offers and discounts on our printed books. This enhancement to our free downloads means that we can reach out even further to inform government decision making and public policy, increase public education and understanding, and promote the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge.

*There are a small number of reports that never had PDF files and, therefore, those reports are not available for download. In addition, part of the series, “Nutrient Requirements of Domestic Animals” are not be available in PDF and future titles in this series will also not have PDFs associated with them.

Eight Question Survey Helps to Predict PTSD

A simple eight-question survey administered soon after injury can help predict which of the 30 million Americans seeking hospital treatment for injuries each year may develop depression or post-traumatic stress, report Therese S. Richmond, PhD, CRNP , associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, and her colleagues in General Hospital Psychiatry.

“Depression and PTSD exert a significant, independent, and persistent effect on general health, work status, somatic symptoms, adjustment to illness, and function after injury,” the authors wrote, also emphasizing that even minor injuries can lead to traumatic stress responses.

Dr. Richmond

The findings allow healthcare providers to identify patients at highest risk for developing these disorders and to target appropriate resources to this vulnerable group.

This screening tool – reportedly one of the first of its kind for adults in the U.S. – could have a great impact on the judicious allocation of costly mental health resources.

Using an eight-question survey, all injured patients can be rapidly assessed for risk in the hospital. Healthcare providers can then provide patients classed as high-risk for developing depression or PTSD with information about symptoms to look for and advise them to contact their primary care providers should symptoms surface. This intervention can facilitate early diagnosis of these disabling disorders.

The study reported nearly 100 percent accuracy in negative results. Only five percent of injured patients who tested negative for risk of depression on the screening survey developed depression and no patients who tested negative for PTSD risk developed PTSD. At the same time, not all patients who screen positive will develop these disorders. The researchers do not suggest that all patients who screen positive receive mental health services, but rather that this finding prompt systematic provision of information and additional follow-up.

The authors caution that while the findings on this initial study are most promising, they need to be replicated in an independent sample.

With Dr. Richmond, the study authors are: Josef Ruzek, PhD; Theimann Ackerson, MSSW; Douglas J. Wiebe, PhD; Flaura Winston, MD, PhD; Nancy Kassam-Adams, PhD.

Seven Decades of Service to Rural and Medically Underserved Families: New Frontier Nursing University Name Becomes Official

HYDEN, Ky., July 6, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — Providing compassionate care for women and families in rural and medically underserved areas for more than 70 years, students and graduates of the Frontier School of Midwifery and Family Nursing have garnered national recognition for their dedication to Frontier’s mission. Proudly, the school has now officially become Frontier Nursing University as of July 1, 2011.

This nationally recognized institution traces its humble beginnings and commitment to service to Mary Breckinridge, a visionary and trailblazing woman who, in 1925, established the Frontier Nursing Service, traveling on horseback through the hills of Eastern Kentucky to serve as a nurse-midwife for mothers during childbirth. Established in 1939, the school was an outgrowth of Mrs. Breckinridge’s dedication, offering the country’s first rural-based nurse-midwifery education program. Over the course of the ensuing decades, students and graduates have expanded her legacy of care by providing health services to women and families in rural communities around the world. In 1970, the school created the first family nurse practitioner program in the United States, and in 2005, the women’s health care nurse practitioner program was added.

Today, Frontier’s educational programs are recognized for their excellence not only across America, but also worldwide. Close to 1,100 students from all 50 states and several foreign countries are enrolled in either Frontier’s Doctor of Nursing Practice or Master of Science in Nursing degree programs, which combine superb online course offerings and real-world practicum.

Dr. Susan Stone, DNSc, CNM, FACNM, President and Dean

Dr. Susan Stone, Frontier’s visionary President and Dean and a certified nurse-midwife, explained: “This new name represents a milestone in the history of our institution: we are a University recognized for our outstanding graduate degree programs, both domestically and worldwide. We’ve just been honored by US News and World Report as being within the top 15 of nurse-midwifery and family nurse practitioner programs in the USA and ranked within the top 50 on their list of graduate schools of nursing nationwide.

“The evolution of the name of our institution reflects both the amazing ‘chronicle’ of our past, as well as the incredible opportunities that lie in our future. All of these milestones are directly attributable to the vision of Mary Breckinridge, the dedication of our board, faculty and staff, and to the increasing worldwide demand for educated women’s and family healthcare professionals.  Combining the Frontier Nursing heritage with our academic excellence as a University, we will more appropriately define the status of our unique institution. As we continue to educate nurses to become nurse-midwives and nurse practitioners, we will fulfill our mission to serve rural and medically underserved communities, while reinforcing our commitment to prepare nurses and midwives for advanced practice both domestically and internationally.”

Click here to learn more about the name change and the mission and purpose of Frontier Nursing University.

The CDC has a sense of humor. Who knew?

Social Media: Preparedness 101: Zombie Apocalypse

There are all kinds of emergencies out there that we can prepare for. Take a zombie apocalypse for example. That’s right, I said z-o-m-b-i-e a-p-o-c-a-l-y-p-s-e. You may laugh now, but when it happens you’ll be happy you read this, and hey, maybe you’ll even learn a thing or two about how to prepare for a real emergency.

To read more about preparing for the worst, click here.

They also have buttons, badges, and widgets for social networking. Yes, even nursing editors can be prepared!

Get A Kit,    Make A Plan, Be Prepared. emergency.cdc.gov

If you're    ready for a zombie apocalypse, then you're ready for any emergency.    emergency.cdc.gov Get A Kit, Make A Plan, Be Prepared. emergency.cdc.gov